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Imaging

Last 50 Imaging Postings

(Click on title to be directed to posting, most recent listed first, CME offerings in bold)

Medical Image of the Week: Mediastinal Lipomatosis
Medical Image of the Week: Dobhoff Tube Placement with Roux-En-Y
   Gastric Bypass
Medical Image of the Week: Atypical Deep Sulcus Sign
April 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Headcheese Sign
Medical Image of the Week: Chronic Bilateral Fibrocavitary Pulmonary
   Coccidioidomycosis
Medical Image of the Week: Paget-Schroetter Syndrome
A Finger-Like Projection in the Carotid Artery: A Rare Source of Embolic 
   Stroke Requiring Carotid Endarterectomy
Medical Image of the Week: Post-Traumatic Diaphragmatic Rupture
Medical Image of the Week: Bronchogenic Cysts
March 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Acute Pneumonitis Secondary to Boric Acid 
   Exposure
Medical Image of the Week: Traumatic Aortic Dissection
Medical Image of the Week: Blue-Green Urine and the Serotonin 
   Syndrome
Medical Image of the Week: Acute Encephalopathy in a Multiple
   Myeloma Patient
February 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Stomach Rupture
Medical Image of the Week: Methemoglobinemia
Medical Image of the Week: Pulmonary Artery Dilation
Medical Image of the Week: Plastic Bronchitis
January 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis
Medical Image of the Week: Fat Embolism
Medical Image of the Week: Central Venous Access with Dextrocardia
Medical Image of the Week: Mucous Plugs Forming Airway Casts
Medical Image of the Week: Barium Aspiration
December 2017 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Yellow Nail Syndrome
Medical Image of the Week: Moyamoya Disease
Medical Image of the Week: Lemierre Syndrome
Medical Image of the Week: Chemotherapy-Induced Diffuse Alveolar 
   Hemorrhage
November 2017 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Erythema Nodosum
Medical Image of the Week: Pulmonary Mycetoma
Medical Image of the Week: Pulmonary Infarction- the “Reverse Halo Sign”
Medical Image of the Week: Pulmonary Artery Sling
Medical Image of the Week: Hypertensive Emergencies
October 2017 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Typical Pulmonary CT Findings Following 
   Radiotherapy
Medical Image of the Week: Pembrolizumab-induced Pneumonitis
Medical Image of the Week: Asbestos Related Pleural Disease
Medical Image of the Week: Fast-growing Primary Malignant Mediastinal 
   Mixed Germ Cell Tumor
September 2017 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: The Atoll Sign in Cryptogenic Organizing 
   Pneumonia
Medical Image of the Week: Cannon V Waves
Medical Image of the Week: Bilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis
Medical Image of the Week: Tortuosity of Thoracic Aorta Mimicking a Lung
   Mass
August 2017 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Portal Vein Thrombosis in a Patient with
   Polycythemia Vera
Medical Image of the Week: Coral Reef Aorta
Medical Image of the Week: Hematopneumatoceles from Pulmonary 
   Lacerations
Medical Image of the Week: Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis
July 2017 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Zenker’s Diverticulum

 

For complete imaging listings click here.

Those who care for patients with pulmonary, critical care or sleep disorders rely heavily on chest radiology and pathology to determine diagnoses. The Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care publishes case-based articles with characteristic chest imaging and related pathology. The editor of this section will oversee and coordinate the publication of a core of the most important chest imaging topics. In doing so, they encourage the submission of unsolicited manuscripts. It cannot be overemphasized that both radiologic and pathologic images must be of excellent quality. As a rule, 600 DPI is sufficient for radiographic and pathologic images. Taking pictures of plain chest radiographs and CT scans with a digital camera is strongly discouraged. The figures should be cited in the text and numbered consecutively. The stain used for pathology specimens and magnification should be mentioned in the figure legend. Those who care for patients with pulmonary, critical care or sleep disorders rely heavily on chest radiology and pathology to determine diagnoses. The Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care publishes case-based articles with characteristic chest imaging and related pathology. The editor of this section will oversee and coordinate the publication of a core of the most important chest imaging topics. In doing so, they encourage the submission of unsolicited manuscripts. It cannot be overemphasized that both radiologic and pathologic images must be of excellent quality. As a rule, 600 DPI is sufficient for radiographic and pathologic images. Taking pictures of plain chest radiographs and CT scans with a digital camera is strongly discouraged. The figures should be cited in the text and numbered consecutively. The stain used for pathology specimens and magnification should be mentioned in the figure legend.

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Wednesday
Apr252018

Medical Image of the Week: Mediastinal Lipomatosis

Figure 1. Chest X-ray showing right sided mediastinal mass.

 

Figure 2. Coronal (A) and axial (B) CT Images showing a right paratracheal homogenously fat-enhancing mass.

 

A 61-year-old man presented to the pulmonary clinic for evaluation of a chronic cough of 6 months’ duration.  Other medical problems included class three obesity, obstructive sleep apnea on CPAP therapy, and hypertension.  Chest X-Ray (Figure 1) revealed a right mediastinal mass which then prompted a chest CT to be performed. The chest CT (Figure 2) demonstrated a homogenously enhancing, well circumscribed and fat-attenuating 8 x 5 cm mass in the right paratracheal region without invasion or compression into surrounding structures.

Mediastinal lipomatosis was diagnosed.  This is a benign soft tissue tumor made of mature adipocytes that can be seen with obesity, chronic corticosteroid use, and Cushing’s syndrome.  They are thought to represent up to 2.3% of all primary mediastinal tumors (1).  They are occasionally associated with compression of surrounding structures which can cause superior vena cava syndrome, dry cough, dysphagia, and occasionally arrhythmias (2).  Management is typically conservative with weight loss encouraged unless mass effect is present that significantly affects quality of life, in which case surgical options may be explored. 

Although this patient’s cough could be due to this lipoma, he also had symptoms of cough possibly exacerbated by severe gastroesophageal reflux disease which was not yet managed.  A trial of a proton pump inhibitor was pursued with follow-up arranged to determine if further intervention is necessary.

Bryan Borg MD and James Knepler MD

Department of Medicine

Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine

University of Arizona

Tucson, AZ USA

References

  1. Gaerte SC, Meyer CA, Winer-Muram HT. Fat-containing lesions of the chest. Radiographics. 2002;22:61-78. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Cutilli T, Schietroma M, Marcelli VA, Ascani G, Corbacelli A. Giant cervico-mediastinal lipoma. A clinical case. Minerva Stomatol. 1999 Jan-Feb;48(1-2):23-8. [PubMed]

Cite as: Borg B, Knepler J. Medical image of the week: mediastinal lipomasosis. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2018;16:228-9. doi: https://doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc046-18 PDF 

Wednesday
Apr182018

Medical Image of the Week: Dobhoff Tube Placement with Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass

Figure 1. Abdominal X-ray after Dobhoff tube (DHT) placement to confirm accurate positioning. The distal tip of the feeding tube is in a loop of jejunum in patient status post gastrojejunostomy.

Figure 2. Gastrointestinal anatomy before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure.

 

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is one of the most commonly performed bariatric operations in the United States.  It involves partitioning a small gastric pouch off the proximal stomach and attaching that pouch directly to the intestine, thereby bypassing the large remainder of the stomach (1,2). Placing a Dobhoff tube (DHT) and confirming its placement can be challenging due to the change in anatomy after the procedure. Here, we have a 65-year-old woman who presented to the hospital with acute encephalopathy and acute hypoxic respiratory failure due to multifocal pneumonia requiring intubation and prolonged ICU stay. A DHT was inserted after intubation for feeding purposes. An abdominal X-ray was obtained to confirm placement of the DHT (Figure 1).  Normally the DHT tip should be placed in the 2nd to 3rd portion of the duodenum and would create a C-shaped tracing on the X-ray. However, in our patient who had history of Roux-en-Y, the DHT bypassed the duodenum and went straight down from the stomach to the jejunum as illustrated in Figure 1. It is important to be aware of this change in anatomy in patients who had a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in order to confirm accurate placement of DHT.

Hasan Ali1 MD, Huthayfa Ateeli2 MBBS, Bhupinder Natt2  MD FACP, and Sachin Chaudhary2 MD.

1Department of Medicine, Division of Internal Medicine and 2Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep and Allergy

University of Arizona College of Medicine

Tucson, AZ USA

References

  1. Smoot TM, Xu P, Hilsenrath P, Kuppersmith NC, Singh KP. Gastric bypass surgery in the United States, 1998–2002. Am J Public Health. 2006;96(7):1187–9. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Santry HP, Gillen DL, Lauderdale DS. Trends in bariatric surgical procedures. JAMA. 2005;294(15):1909–17. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cite as: Ali H, Ateeli H, Natt B, Chaudhary S. Medical image of the week: Dobhoff tube placement with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2018;16(4):226-7. doi: https://doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc045-18 PDF