Search Journal-type in search term and press enter
In Memoriam
Social Media-Follow Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care on Facebook and Twitter

Imaging

Last 50 Imaging Postings

(Click on title to be directed to posting, most recent listed first, CME offerings in bold)

Medical Image of the Month: Large Complex Cerebral Arteriovenous
   Malformation 
Medical Image of the Month: Renal Cell Carcinoma with Extensive Tumor
   Thrombus
Medical Image of the Month: Mounier-Kuhn Syndrome
Medical Image of the Week: Diffuse Pulmonary Ossification
August 2019 Imaging Case of the Month: A 51-Year-Old Man with a
   Headache 
Medical Image of the Month: Reexpansion Pulmonary Edema
Medical Image of the Month: Bilateral Atrial Enlargement
Medical Image of the Month: Thymolipoma
Medical Image of the Month: Double Aortic Arch
May 2019 Imaging Case of the Month: Asymptomatic Pulmonary
   Nodules and Cysts in a 47-Year-Old Woman
Medical Image of the Month: Ludwig’s Angina
Medical Image of the Month: Incarcerated Morgagni Hernia
Medical Image of the Month: Pectus Excavatum
February 2019 Imaging Case of the Month: Recurrent Bronchitis and 
   Pneumonia in a 66-Year-Old Woman
Medical Image of the Month: Massive Right Atrial Dilation After Mitral Valve
   Replacement
Medical Image of the Month: Chronic Ogilvie’s Syndrome
Medical Image of the Month: Malignant Pleural and Pericardial Effusions
November 2018 Imaging Case of the Month: Respiratory Failure in a 
   36-Year-Old Woman
Medical Image of the Month: Superior Vena Cava Syndrome
Medical Image of the Month: Hot Tub Lung
Medical Image of the Week: Chylothorax
August 2018 Imaging Case of the Month: Dyspnea in a 55-Year-Old 
   Smoker
Medical Image of the Week: Tracheobronchopathia Osteochondroplastica
Medical Image of the Week: Plastic Bronchitis in an Adult Lung Transplant
   Patient
Medical Image of the Week: Medical Administrative Growth
Medical Image of the Week: Malposition of Central Venous Catheter
Medical Image of the Week: Fournier’s Gangrene with a Twist
July 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Intracavitary View of Mycetoma
Medical Image of the Week: Neuromyelitis Optica and Sarcoidosis
Medical Image of the Week: Pulmonary Amyloidosis in Primary Sjogren’s
   Syndrome
Medical Image of the Week: Post Pneumonectomy Syndrome
June 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Elemental Mercury Poisoning
Medical Image of the Week: Thoracic Splenosis
Medical Image of the Week: Valley Fever Cavity with Fungus Ball
Medical Image of the Week: Recurrent Sarcoidosis Resembling Malignancy
May 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings
   of Severe RV Failure
Medical Image of the Week: Mediastinal Lipomatosis
Medical Image of the Week: Dobhoff Tube Placement with Roux-En-Y
   Gastric Bypass
Medical Image of the Week: Atypical Deep Sulcus Sign
April 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Headcheese Sign
Medical Image of the Week: Chronic Bilateral Fibrocavitary Pulmonary
   Coccidioidomycosis
Medical Image of the Week: Paget-Schroetter Syndrome
A Finger-Like Projection in the Carotid Artery: A Rare Source of Embolic 
   Stroke Requiring Carotid Endarterectomy
Medical Image of the Week: Post-Traumatic Diaphragmatic Rupture
Medical Image of the Week: Bronchogenic Cysts
March 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Acute Pneumonitis Secondary to Boric Acid 
   Exposure
Medical Image of the Week: Traumatic Aortic Dissection
Medical Image of the Week: Blue-Green Urine and the Serotonin 
   Syndrome
Medical Image of the Week: Acute Encephalopathy in a Multiple
   Myeloma Patient
February 2018 Imaging Case of the Month

 

For complete imaging listings click here.

Those who care for patients with pulmonary, critical care or sleep disorders rely heavily on chest radiology and pathology to determine diagnoses. The Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care publishes case-based articles with characteristic chest imaging and related pathology. The editor of this section will oversee and coordinate the publication of a core of the most important chest imaging topics. In doing so, they encourage the submission of unsolicited manuscripts. It cannot be overemphasized that both radiologic and pathologic images must be of excellent quality. As a rule, 600 DPI is sufficient for radiographic and pathologic images. Taking pictures of plain chest radiographs and CT scans with a digital camera is strongly discouraged. The figures should be cited in the text and numbered consecutively. The stain used for pathology specimens and magnification should be mentioned in the figure legend. Those who care for patients with pulmonary, critical care or sleep disorders rely heavily on chest radiology and pathology to determine diagnoses. The Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care publishes case-based articles with characteristic chest imaging and related pathology. The editor of this section will oversee and coordinate the publication of a core of the most important chest imaging topics. In doing so, they encourage the submission of unsolicited manuscripts. It cannot be overemphasized that both radiologic and pathologic images must be of excellent quality. As a rule, 600 DPI is sufficient for radiographic and pathologic images. Taking pictures of plain chest radiographs and CT scans with a digital camera is strongly discouraged. The figures should be cited in the text and numbered consecutively. The stain used for pathology specimens and magnification should be mentioned in the figure legend.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

Thursday
May022019

Medical Image of the Month: Double Aortic Arch

Figure 1. A chest radiograph performed after endotracheal intubation of the patient demonstrated prominence of the upper mediastinum in the region of the right paratracheal strip (red arrow).

 

Figure 2. A non-contrasted CT of the chest demonstrates a complete vascular ring secondary to the patient’s double aortic arch (outlined in red) surrounding the trachea (T) and esophagus (E).

 

Case Presentation: A 78-year-old gentleman presented to the hospital via EMS with altered mental status. An urgent CT of the head performed in the emergency room demonstrated a large, right intraparenchymal hemorrhage with intraventricular extension into the right lateral ventricle. His Glascow Coma Scale score was 6, and he was intubated for airway protection.  A chest radiograph performed to verify placement of the endotracheal tube demonstrated prominence of the upper mediastinum in the region of the right paratracheal strip (Figure 1). A CT of the chest (Figure 2) demonstrated a double aortic arch corresponding to the upper mediastinal abnormality noted on the chest radiograph. In speaking with the patient’s family after acquiring the CT of the chest, they stated that the patient had long-term issues with dysphagia – specifically choking with solid foods. Unfortunately, the patient passed away from complications of his large intraparenchymal hemorrhage.

A double aortic arch results from persistence of both the right and left embryonic arches with each arch giving rise to the ipsilateral, separate carotid and subclavian arteries (1). A double aortic arch is the most common cause of a symptomatic vascular ring with the trachea and esophagus being compressed by the two arches (1). Symptoms usually arise in childhood with good outcomes with surgical repair of this abnormality in pediatric populations. A few case series exist describing repair of this anomaly in adult populations (2).

Kelly Wickstrom DO, Steven P. Sears DO, and Laura Meinke MD

Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine

University of Arizona College of Medicine

Tucson, AZ USA

References

  1. Hanneman K, Newman B, Chan F. Congenital variants and anomalies of the aortic arch. Radiographics. 2017 Jan-Feb;37(1):32-51. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Noguchi K, Hori D, Nomura Y, Tanaka H. Double aortic arch in an adult. Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2012 Jun;14(6):900-2. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cite as: Wickstrom K, Sears SP, Meinke L. Medical image of the month: Double aortic arch. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2019;18(5):120-1. doi: https://doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc019-19 PDF 

Wednesday
May012019

May 2019 Imaging Case of the Month: Asymptomatic Pulmonary Nodules and Cysts in a 47-Year-Old Woman

Michael B. Gotway, MD

Department of Radiology

Mayo Clinic Arizona

Scottsdale, AZ USA

 

Imaging Case of the Month CME Information  

Completion of an evaluation form is required to receive credit and a link is provided on the last panel of the activity.

0.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™

Estimated time to complete this activity: 0.50 hours

Lead Author(s): Michael B. Gotway, MD. All Faculty, CME Planning Committee Members, and the CME Office Reviewers have disclosed that they do not have any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests that would constitute a conflict of interest concerning this CME activity. 

Learning Objectives: As a result of completing this activity, participants will be better able to:

  1. Interpret and identify clinical practices supported by the highest quality available evidence.
  2. Establish the optimal evaluation leading to a correct diagnosis for patients with pulmonary, critical care and sleep disorders.
  3. Translate the most current clinical information into the delivery of high quality care for patients.
  4. Integrate new treatment options for patients with pulmonary, critical care and sleep related disorders.

Learning Format: Case-based, interactive online course, including mandatory assessment questions (number of questions varies by case). Please also read the Technical Requirements.

CME Sponsor: University of Arizona College of Medicine at the Arizona Health Sciences Center.

Current Approval Period: January 1, 2019-December 31, 2020

 

Clinical History: A 47-year-old previously healthy woman presented to her new physician for a routine physical examination. The patient had no complaints. The patient’s physical examination showed normal vital signs and clear lungs; the physical examination was essentially unremarkable. The patient’s past medical history included a brief smoking history, having quit over 20 years earlier, as well as seasonal allergies. Her past surgical history included an appendectomy nearly 20 years earlier and a hysterectomy for bleeding related to uterine leiomyomas approximately 12 years prior to presentation. The patient was not taking any prescription medications.

Basic laboratory data, including a complete blood count, electrolyte panel, and liver function studies were all within the normal range. An electrocardiogram revealed normal findings. Frontal and lateral chest radiography (Figure 1) was performed.

Figure 1. Frontal (A) and lateral (B) chest radiography.

Which of the following statements regarding the chest radiograph is most accurate? (click on the correct answer to be directed to the second of eleven pages)

  1. The chest radiograph shows mediastinal and hilar lymph node enlargement
  2. The chest radiograph shows multifocal nodular pulmonary consolidation
  3. The chest radiograph shows multiple, bilateral cavitary nodules
  4. The chest radiograph shows multiple, bilateral circumscribed nodules
  5. The chest radiograph shows nodular interstitial thickening

Cite as: Gotway MB. May 2019 imaging case of the month: Asymptomatic pulmonary nodules and cysts in a 47-year-old woman. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2019;18(5):106-19. doi: https://doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc022-19 PDF