Search Journal-type in search term and press enter
Social Media-Follow Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care on Facebook and Twitter

Imaging

Last 50 Imaging Postings

(Click on title to be directed to posting, most recent listed first, CME offerings in bold)

Medical Image of the Month: Massive Right Atrial Dilation After Mitral Valve
   Replacement
Medical Image of the Month: Chronic Ogilvie’s Syndrome
Medical Image of the Month: Malignant Pleural and Pericardial Effusions
November 2018 Imaging Case of the Month: Respiratory Failure in a 
   36-Year-Old Woman
Medical Image of the Month: Superior Vena Cava Syndrome
Medical Image of the Month: Hot Tub Lung
Medical Image of the Week: Chylothorax
August 2018 Imaging Case of the Month: Dyspnea in a 55-Year-Old 
   Smoker
Medical Image of the Week: Tracheobronchopathia Osteochondroplastica
Medical Image of the Week: Plastic Bronchitis in an Adult Lung Transplant
   Patient
Medical Image of the Week: Medical Administrative Growth
Medical Image of the Week: Malposition of Central Venous Catheter
Medical Image of the Week: Fournier’s Gangrene with a Twist
July 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Intracavitary View of Mycetoma
Medical Image of the Week: Neuromyelitis Optica and Sarcoidosis
Medical Image of the Week: Pulmonary Amyloidosis in Primary Sjogren’s
   Syndrome
Medical Image of the Week: Post Pneumonectomy Syndrome
June 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Elemental Mercury Poisoning
Medical Image of the Week: Thoracic Splenosis
Medical Image of the Week: Valley Fever Cavity with Fungus Ball
Medical Image of the Week: Recurrent Sarcoidosis Resembling Malignancy
May 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings
   of Severe RV Failure
Medical Image of the Week: Mediastinal Lipomatosis
Medical Image of the Week: Dobhoff Tube Placement with Roux-En-Y
   Gastric Bypass
Medical Image of the Week: Atypical Deep Sulcus Sign
April 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Headcheese Sign
Medical Image of the Week: Chronic Bilateral Fibrocavitary Pulmonary
   Coccidioidomycosis
Medical Image of the Week: Paget-Schroetter Syndrome
A Finger-Like Projection in the Carotid Artery: A Rare Source of Embolic 
   Stroke Requiring Carotid Endarterectomy
Medical Image of the Week: Post-Traumatic Diaphragmatic Rupture
Medical Image of the Week: Bronchogenic Cysts
March 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Acute Pneumonitis Secondary to Boric Acid 
   Exposure
Medical Image of the Week: Traumatic Aortic Dissection
Medical Image of the Week: Blue-Green Urine and the Serotonin 
   Syndrome
Medical Image of the Week: Acute Encephalopathy in a Multiple
   Myeloma Patient
February 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Stomach Rupture
Medical Image of the Week: Methemoglobinemia
Medical Image of the Week: Pulmonary Artery Dilation
Medical Image of the Week: Plastic Bronchitis
January 2018 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis
Medical Image of the Week: Fat Embolism
Medical Image of the Week: Central Venous Access with Dextrocardia
Medical Image of the Week: Mucous Plugs Forming Airway Casts
Medical Image of the Week: Barium Aspiration
December 2017 Imaging Case of the Month
Medical Image of the Week: Yellow Nail Syndrome
Medical Image of the Week: Moyamoya Disease
Medical Image of the Week: Lemierre Syndrome

 

For complete imaging listings click here.

Those who care for patients with pulmonary, critical care or sleep disorders rely heavily on chest radiology and pathology to determine diagnoses. The Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care publishes case-based articles with characteristic chest imaging and related pathology. The editor of this section will oversee and coordinate the publication of a core of the most important chest imaging topics. In doing so, they encourage the submission of unsolicited manuscripts. It cannot be overemphasized that both radiologic and pathologic images must be of excellent quality. As a rule, 600 DPI is sufficient for radiographic and pathologic images. Taking pictures of plain chest radiographs and CT scans with a digital camera is strongly discouraged. The figures should be cited in the text and numbered consecutively. The stain used for pathology specimens and magnification should be mentioned in the figure legend. Those who care for patients with pulmonary, critical care or sleep disorders rely heavily on chest radiology and pathology to determine diagnoses. The Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care publishes case-based articles with characteristic chest imaging and related pathology. The editor of this section will oversee and coordinate the publication of a core of the most important chest imaging topics. In doing so, they encourage the submission of unsolicited manuscripts. It cannot be overemphasized that both radiologic and pathologic images must be of excellent quality. As a rule, 600 DPI is sufficient for radiographic and pathologic images. Taking pictures of plain chest radiographs and CT scans with a digital camera is strongly discouraged. The figures should be cited in the text and numbered consecutively. The stain used for pathology specimens and magnification should be mentioned in the figure legend.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

Wednesday
Aug012018

Medical Image of the Week: Tracheobronchopathia Osteochondroplastica

Figure 1. View of trachea during bronchoscopy showing submucosal nodules.

 

Figure 2. H & E staining of cartilage biopsy.

 

A 52-year-old asymptomatic woman underwent a low dose computed tomography (CT) of chest due to long-standing history of smoking. CT chest revealed a 4 mm right lower lobe pulmonary nodule. Also noted were several nodules throughout the trachea and in the left main-stem bronchus. Bronchoscopy revealed multiple non-obstructing submucosal nodules along the tracheal rings with sparing of the posterior membranous portion of the trachea (Figure 1).  Endotracheal biopsy showed benign cartilage and ciliated epithelium (Figure 2). The patient was diagnosed with tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica (TO). Clinical manifestations of TO are nonspecific and include cough, wheezing, hemoptysis, dyspnea, and recurrent lung infections (1). Therapy for TO includes alleviation of symptoms with bronchodilators, treatment of respiratory infections and tracheal dilation.  Therapeutic modalities for tracheal dilation includes surgical resection, laser ablation and vaporization.  CT chest was to be repeated at 12 months for follow-up of the pulmonary nodule. The patient was lost to follow-up.

Benjamin O. Lawson MD1, Kelechi Abarikwu2, and Aditya Gupta MD3

1Internal Medicine and 3Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine

HonorHealth Scottsdale Thompson Peak Medical Center

Scottsdale, AZ USA

2University of Arizona Tucson

Tucson, AZ USA

Reference

  1. Simmons C, Vinh D, Donovan DT, Ongkasuwan J. Tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica. Laryngoscope. 2016 Sep;126(9):2006-9. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cite as: Lawson BO, Abarikwu K, Gupta A. Medical image of the week: Tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2018;17(2):45-6. doi: https://doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc094-18 PDF

Wednesday
Jul252018

Medical Image of the Week: Plastic Bronchitis in an Adult Lung Transplant Patient

Figure 1. Representative coronal (A) and axial (B) views of the thoracic CT scan in lung windows revealing bilateral dense consolidations and bronchial filling.

 

Figure 2. Photograph of bronchial gelatinous casts after bronchoscopic forceps removal.

 

Plastic Bronchitis is a rare condition characterized by the formation of branching gelatinous casts of the bronchial tree which lead to regional airway obstruction. There are thought to be two classifications of casts; type I being the formation of cellular inflammatory casts while type II are acellular. This entity is a well described complication of the Fontan procedure, a therapeutic intervention in pediatric patients with univentricular congenital heart disease (1). The condition is less well reported and thus recognized in adult populations (2).

Our patient is a 37-year-old man who is status post bilateral lung transplantation undertaken for severe workplace inhalation injury complicated by constrictive bronchiolitis-obliterans. Post-transplant, the patient suffered from refractory severe persistent asthma of the donor lung and therefore was scheduled for elective initial bronchial thermoplasty. Post-procedure the patient developed progressive respiratory distress and ultimately extremis requiring mechanical ventilation. Pulse-dose corticosteroids were initiated given a suspected etiology of acute rejection, although response to therapy was poor. Bronchoscopy was conducted which revealed diffuse fibrin casts of the right lung consistent with the development of plastic bronchitis. Symptoms significantly improved with removal of these casts, although a repeat bronchoscopy with cast removal was necessary shortly afterward. Our patient’s cast formation is unique given that it likely has components of both etiologies given his underlying bronchial hyper-secretory disorder and lymphatic disruption after lung transplant. For this reason, we consider this a unique case in its ability to highlight the overlap of these two pathologic processes in an otherwise unlikely demographic to develop bronchial casts. In our comprehensive literature search, we were unable to find significant description of this disorder in adult lung transplant. However, given the disruption in lymphatics, host vs graft inflammatory factors, and infectious inflammatory factors, it would seem to be a perfect setup pathologically. The underlying pathophysiologic mechanism of plastic bronchitis is believed to be cast formation via pulmonary lymphatic disruption by either surgical intervention or inflammatory processes. Gelatinous casts are formed by way of alveolar capillary leak of proteinaceous material, lymphatic seepage, and exudate accumulation from airway inflammation. The majority of literature regarding this disease processes has been described in pediatric thoracic surgery. Lung transplant, especially in the setting of acute rejection, seems to be a setup for this condition in adult populations.

Sarika Savajiyani DO, Nafis Shamsid-Deen MD, and  Raed Alalawi MD

University of Arizona, College of Medicine-Phoenix

Phoenix, AZ USA

References

  1. Singhi AK, Vinoth B, Kuruvilla S, Sivakumar K. Plastic bronchitis. Ann Pediatr Cardiol. 2015 Sep-Dec;8(3):246-8. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Eberlein M, Parekh K, Hansdottir S, Keech J, Klesney-Tait J. Plastic bronchitis complicating primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. Ann Thorac Surg. 2014 Nov;98(5):1849. [CrossRef]

Cite as: Savajiyani S, Shamsid-Deen N, Alalawi R. Medical image of the week: Plastic bronchitis in an adult lung transplant patient. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2018;17(1):39-40. doi: https://doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc088-18 PDF