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Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

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November 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes 
July 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
July 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
July 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
February 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
December 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
October 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
July 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
June 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2013 Council of Chapter Representatives Notes
May 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
April 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes 
March 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2013 Council of Chapter Representatives Meeting 
and “Hill Day” Notes
February 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
October 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2012 Special Meeting Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
June 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2012 Council of Chapter Representatives Meeting
May 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

 

For a complete list of the Arizona Thoracic Society notes click here.

The Arizona Thoracic Society meets every other month in Phoenix, usually on the fourth Wednesday of odd numbered months, from 6:30-8:00  PM at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Hospital located at Shea and 90th Street in Phoenix. During these meetings dinner and case presentations occur.

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Entries in Valley Fever (6)

Wednesday
Oct032018

September 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes 

The September 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, September 26, 2018 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were representatives in attendance from the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities.

At the beginning of the meeting attendance was again discussed.

There were 3 case presentations:

  1. Dr. Gerry Schwartzberg presented a case of a woman in her 70’s with diffuse cystic lung disease. She had a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance due to light chain disease and the possibility of amyloidosis causing cystic lung disease was discussed.  
  2. Dr. Lewis Wesselius presented a 28-year-old man from Tennessee with enlarging lung nodules who had been treated for presumed histoplasmosis, but was having hemoptysis and clinically worsening. Lung biopsy demonstrated metastatic angiosarcoma.  
  3. Dr. Wesselius also presented a 44-year-old woman with diabetes and cavitary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis which involved both left upper lobe and left lower lobe which had progressed despite 400 mg/day of fluconazole who had been referred in 2012 for possible thoracotomy. Surgery was deferred since it would have required a left pneumonectomy. The fluconazole dose was increased, and cavity resolved gradually over 6 years.  This led to discussion of indications for surgery in cavitary coccidioidomycosis. 

The meeting was adjourned about 8 PM. The next meeting will be on November 28 at 6:30 PM at HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital.

Lewis J. Wesselius, MD
President, Arizona Thoracic Society

Cite as: Wesselius LJ. September 2018 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2018;17:116. doi: https://doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc109-18 PDF 

Thursday
Nov192015

November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. 

There were 3 case presentations:

  1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented a case of a 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes, alcoholism and tobacco abuse who has a history of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) with a residual thin-walled cavity in his right upper lobe (RUL). After quitting drinking and smoking and years of being asymptomatic, he presented with hemoptysis. Chest x-ray showed increasing density in the RUL. CT scan showed an intracavitary density in his previous cavity presumably a fungus ball. Sputum cultures are pending. Discussion followed on management of fungus balls. Bronchoscopy was recommended to view the bronchial anatomy to exclude other diagnosis as well as obtaining additional cultures. The consensus of the group was operative intervention if possible. If not, bronchial artery embolization was offered as an alternative.
  2. Dr. Schwartzberg presented a second case of a middle-aged woman with a past history of Valley Fever who was treated and left with a negative serology and a pulmonary nodule. She has developed rheumatoid arthritis and is being considered for biological therapy. The question was whether she should received fluconazole during therapy. No one knew of any data but the group advised caution and suggested fluconazole during immunosuppressive therapy.
  3. Dr. Lewis Wesselius presented a case of an 18-year-old with a prior diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. CT scan revealed multiple lung cysts. Dr. Wesselius reviewed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM) (1,2). CPAM, previously known as congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, is a developmental lesion of the lung comprising single or multiple cysts of uniform or varying sizes arising from anomalous growth of airways. Most of the cases are identified in infants and neonates with respiratory distress. Rarely, CPAM can present in adulthood with recurrent chest infections, pneumothorax, hemoptysis, or dyspnea. Dr. Michael Gotway showed CT scans of several additional patients.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned about 7:45 PM. The next meeting will be in Phoenix on Wednesday, January 27,2016 at 6:30 PM. A change of venue was discussed and will be announced prior to the meeting.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

Editor, SWJPCC

References

  1. Dowton SB, Pincott S, Demmer L. Respiratory complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. Clin Genet. 1996;50(6):510-4. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Baral D, Adhikari B, Zaccarini D, Dongol RM, Sah B. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation in an adult male: a case report with literature review. Case Rep Pulmonol. 2015;2015:743452. [CrossRef] [PubMed] 

Cite as: Robbins RA. November 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2015;11(5):233-4. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc143-15 PDF

Thursday
Jul232015

July 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The July 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, July 23, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities.

It was decided to continue holding the meeting on the fourth Wednesday of the odd numbered months.

Lewis Wesselius relayed a request from the Mayo Clinic regarding a survey on how physicians in Arizona treat Valley Fever. There were no objections to using our mailing list to send out the survey.

Dr. Parides formed a committee to encourage younger clinicians to attend the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings.

Richard A. Robbins was chose as the Arizona Thoracic Society's nominee for clinician of the year.

There were 3 case presentations:

  1. George Parides presented a 58-year-old woman with a past medical history of cavitating coccidioidomycosis in both upper lobes from which she had recovered. However, on thoracic CT scan she had traction bronchiectasis as well as narrowing of the inferior vena cava. It had been recommended that a vena cava filter be placed to prevent pulmonary embolism. She had no history of deep venous thrombosis. None in the audience knew of any data suggesting placement of a filter was indicated.
  2. Lewis Wesselius presented a case of a 19-year-old man who presented with dyspnea and bilateral large pulmonary nodules. He had a history of smoking about 5 cigarettes per day and use of medical marijuana for sinusitis. Laboratory workup showed an elevated white blood cell count but a cANCA and cultures was negative. Bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage demonstrated alveolar hemorrhage. Open biopsy was consistent with pulmonary pyoderma gangrenosum. The patient was begun on corticosteroids and had resolution of both his symptoms and nodules.
  3. Rick Robbins presented Drs. Ling and Boivin's case of a 40 year old man with a history of opioid abuse who was mechanically ventilated but failed an extubation trial (1). The videos of the diaphragm were presented along with a discussion of the diaphragm thickening fraction (DTF) assessed by ultrasound as a predictor for the success of extubation. DTF is calculated using the following formula: Thickness at end inspiration - Thickness at end expiration / Thickness at end expiration. Based on the study published by Ferarri and associates (2), they found that a DTF > 36% would provide a sensitivity of 0.82, a specificity of 0.88, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.92 and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 0.75.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned about 8 PM. The next meeting will be in Phoenix at Scottsdale Shea on Wednesday, September 28 at 6:30 PM.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

Editor, SWJPCC

References

  1. Ling D, Boivin M. Ultrasound for critical care physicians: take a deep breath. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2015;11(1):38-41. [CrossRef]
  2. Ferrari G, De Filippi G, Elia F, Panero F, Volpicelli G, Aprà F. Diaphragm ultrasound as a new index of discontinuation from mechanical ventilation. Crit Ultrasound J. 2014;6(1):8. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Reference as: Robbins RA. July 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2015;11(1):49-50. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc098-15 PDF

Saturday
Aug302014

August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/27/14 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities.

A presentation was given by Julie Reid of the American Lung Association in Arizona on their Lung Force initiative. This is an initiative to make women more aware that lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer deaths in women. There will be a fund raising Lung Force Walk on November 15, 2014 in Phoenix. More information can be found at http://www.lungforce.org/walk-events or http://www.lung.org/associations/states/arizona/local-offices/phoenix/ or contact Julie Reid at JReid@Lung Arizona.org or (602) 258-7505.

A discussion was instigated by Dr. Parides on whether there is an increased risk of clinical Valley Fever in patients previously treated who begin therapy with biological therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. The common practice has been to initiate azole antifungal therapy in patients who begin biologics for rheumatoid arthritis. Although all agreed there was an increased risk of Valley Fever in patients treated with biological therapy, none were aware of any patients who developed Valley Fever who had previously been treated with azole therapy. This was extended to similar discussions including whether patients who had previously been treated for a +PPD need anti-tuberculosis therapy. This has been common practice, but again, none were aware of any cases or literature.

Lewis Wesselius presented a 66 year old man with a history of multiple pneumonias and skin infections. The patient was short with a prominent forehead. Immunoglobulin evaluation revealed a normal IgG and IgM but a markedly elevated IgE of 7419 kIU/mL (normal <380 kIU/mL). The patient was diagnosed with hyperimmunogloublin E syndrome, also known as Job's syndrome. For a review of this case as well as a differential diagnosis of elevated IgE please see the "September 2014 Pulmonary Case of the Month: A Case for Biblical Scholars" which will be posted on 9/1/14.

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned about 7:45 PM. The next meeting will be Tucson on Wednesday, September 24. Time and location to be announced.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

Reference as: Robbins RA. August 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2014;9(2):145. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc114-14 PDF

Thursday
Jun262014

June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 6/25/14 at the Bio5 building on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus in Tucson beginning at 5:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 33 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities.

Four cases were presented:

  1. Eric Chase presented a 68 year old incarcerated man shortness of breath, chest pain and productive cough.  The patient was a  poor historian. He was supposed to be receiving morphine for back pain but this had been held. He also had a 45 pound weight loss over the past year. His PMH was positive for COPD, hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic back pain and  hepatitis C. Past surgical history included a back operation and some sort of chest operation. On physical examination he was  tachypneic, tachycardic  and multiple scars over his neck, back and chest including a median sternotomy scan. Subcutaneous emphysema was present. Laboratory evaluation was most remarkable for a lactate of 4.6 mg/dL. Chest x-ray revealed subcutaneous and mediastinal air, LLL consolidation, and a left pleural effusion.  Thoracentesis of the pleural effusion showed a high amylase and a low pH. A chest tube was placed. Esophagram showed contrast draining through the left chest and chest tube. CT scan was consistent with a colonic interposition graft with a graft to pleural fistula. The patient was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate and a jejunostomy tube was placed.
  2. Mohammad Dalabih presented a 72 year old woman with asthma who had no response to asthma medications. Spirometry was consistent with moderate restriction. A thoracic CT scan showed two small nodules along with mosaic attenuation. A lung wedge biopsy showed nonmalignant appearing cells with tumorlets and bronchitis. The cells were CD56 positive. A diagnosis of diffuse interstitial pulmonary neuroendocrine hyperplasia (DIPNECH). Dr. Dalabih reviewed DIPNECH which usually presents in middle aged women with symptoms of cough and dyspnea; obstructive abnormalities on pulmonary function testing; and radiographic imaging showing pulmonary nodules, ground-glass attenuation, and bronchiectasis. In general, the clinical course remains stable; however, progression to respiratory failure can occur. Long-term follow- up studies and the best treatment remains unknown. The April 2014 Pulmonary Case of the Month also presented a case of DIPNECH (1).
  3. Mohammad Alzoubaidi presented the case of a 61 year old woman with right upper quadrant pain who was found to have a large liver lesion on abdominal CT scan. She suffered a cardiac arrest shortly after the CT scan and her hemoglobin decreased to 5.6 g/dL. Angiography revealed multiple pseudoaneursyms with the largest apparently bleeding. Coil embolization was performed but a couple of days later her shock recurred. A repeat angiogram showed enlargement of the known pseudoaneursyms and several new ones. She was begun on corticosteroids for a presumed vasculitis. Unfortunately, she continued to bleed and died. Autopsy was consistent with fibromuscular dysplasia.  Fibromuscular dysplasia is a non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory disease of the blood vessels resulting in constriction and dilatation (pseudoaneursyms) (2). The cause and best treatment are unknown.
  4. John Bloom presented a 22 year old Somali man that grew up in India who came to the US about 15 months before presentation. He was relatively asymptomatic but was found to have supraclavicular adenopathy on a "wellness" physical examination. Biopsy of the lymph nodes was recommended but he refused. He presented about a month later with neck and back pain. Physical examination revealed by adenopathy and a fever of 38.2º C. His white blood cell count was 12,600 cells/µL. Thoracic CT showed a miliary pattern with vertebral destruction. Laminectomy with cord stabilization was performed. Biopsy was negative for acid fast bacilli but positive for GMS+ organisms consistent with coccidioidomycosis. A large cervical paraspinal abscess just below the skull was drained and a large mediastinal abscess was also seen on CT scan. Discussion ensued about whether drainage was appropriate for the mediastinal mass, but most thought not.  The case illustrates that Valley Fever is common and in most chest differential diagnosis in the Southwest.

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned about 6:45 PM. There will be no meeting in July. The next meeting in Phoenix will be a case presentation conference on August 27, 6:30 PM at Scottsdale Shea Hospital.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

References

  1. Wesselius LJ. April 2014 pulmonary case of the month: DIP-what? Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2014;8(4):195-203. [CrossRef]
  2. Slovut DP, Olin JW. Fibromuscular dysplasia. N Engl J Med. 2004;350(18):1862-71. [CrossRef] [PubMed] 

Reference as: Robbins RA. June 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2014;8(6):356-7. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc084-14 PDF