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Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

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November 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes 
July 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
July 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
July 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
February 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
December 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
October 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
July 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
June 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2013 Council of Chapter Representatives Notes
May 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
April 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes 
March 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2013 Council of Chapter Representatives Meeting 
and “Hill Day” Notes
February 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
October 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2012 Special Meeting Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
June 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2012 Council of Chapter Representatives Meeting
May 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

 

For a complete list of the Arizona Thoracic Society notes click here.

The Arizona Thoracic Society meets every other month in Phoenix, usually on the fourth Wednesday of odd numbered months, from 6:30-8:00  PM at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Hospital located at Shea and 90th Street in Phoenix. During these meetings dinner and case presentations occur.

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Entries in pirfenidone (4)

Wednesday
Mar282018

March 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The March 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 12 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, infectious disease and radiology communities.

At the beginning of the meeting several issues were discussed:

  1. The Tobacco 21 which had been introduced into the Arizona House was killed in committee by Rep. Jeff Weninger, Chairman of the Commerce Committee.
  2. Council of Chapter Representatives (CCR) Meeting and “Hill Day” was cancelled due to inclement weather. It will probably be rescheduled for the summer.

An update on pirfenidone in IPF was presented by Jessica Castle, PhD, Medical Science Liaison with Genentech. Dr. Castle discussed the antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects of pirfenidone.

Data was also presented from post-hoc analysis from pirfenidone trials.

  • Overall no difference in morality data
  • Reduction in respiratory hospitalizations
  • Reduction in deaths after respiratory hospitalizations
  • Quantitative Image Analysis showed a decrease in fibrosis with pirfenidone

Lastly, Dr. Castle introduced several ongoing trials with combination therapy for IPF.

There were 3 case presentations:

  1. Dr. Tim Kuberski, Chief of Infectious Disease at Maricopa, presented a 45-year-old Caucasian man who collapsed in the market and was brought to Maricopa Medical Center. He had evolving gangrene of his distal extremities which proved to be secondary to Yersinia pestis. He received continuous sympathetic blockade to treat his gangrene (1). The patient’s gangrene of his toes resolved but he did require amputation of his fingers and reconstruction of his ears and nose.
  2. Dr. Richard Robbins presented a 54-year-old man with triad asthma, eosinophilia and coronary artery spasm. He was begun on montelukast and was doing well. He presented a series from New Zealand of 15 patients with eosinophilia and coronary artery spasm (2). Four of the patients were noted to have asthma. No one could recall a similar case.
  3. Dr. Lewis Wesselius presented an 72-year-old woman who was a life-long nonsmoker with progressive dyspnea over 3-4 years. She had bibasilar crackles on physical examination and a low DLco on pulmonary function testing. Thoracic CT scan showed subtle changes of bibasilar reticulation. This did not appear to be UIP. Biopsy showed rather uniform changes with alveolar wall thickening but not areas characteristic for a definitive diagnosis. The consensus was that her case was most likely chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned about 8:30 PM. The next meeting will be in Phoenix on May 23 at 6:30 PM at HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital. This will be a planning meeting to structure Arizona Thoracic Society meetings and activities.

Richard A. Robbins MD

Editor, SWJPCC

References

  1. Kuberski T, Robinson L, Schurgin A. A case of plague successfully treated with ciprofloxacin and sympathetic blockade for treatment of gangrene. Clin Infect Dis. 2003 Feb 15;36(4):521-3. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Wong CW, Luis S, Zeng I, Stewart RA. Eosinophilia and coronary artery vasospasm. Heart Lung Circ. 2008 Dec;17(6):488-96. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cite as: Robbins RA. March 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2018;16(3):170-1. doi: https://doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc051-18 PDF 

Sunday
Jan282018

January 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The January 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 11 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities.

At the beginning of the meeting several issues were discussed:

  1. CME for Arizona Thoracic Society Meetings. Dr. Robbins will be going to Washington and will meet with the ATS concerning obtaining CME for the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings.
  2. Tobacco 21. It was unclear if any action was occurring. Dr. Parides said he would check.
  3. Council of Chapter Representatives (CCR) Meeting and “Hill Day”. Dr. Robbins will be attending the CCR meeting March 21-22 for Dr. Schwartzberg. This includes meeting with the Arizona Congressional representatives. Those that have issues they wish presented to either the ATS leadership or their legislators should contact Dr. Robbins at rickrobbins@cox.net

There were 4 case presentations:

  1. Dr. Gerry Swartzberg presented a follow-up of a now 74-year-old who was presented in 2014 who was asymptomatic but with a CT scan showing cysts.  No diagnosis was made at that time. She has been followed for the last 3 years. She now has some shortness of breath with exertion. It was discovered that she had cockatiels. A complete “bird” hypersensitivity was recommended but the patient declined because of cost. A repeat CT in late 2017 showed that the cysts had enlarged. A pigeon serum serologic test was positive. Dr. Gotway pointed out that lung cysts can occur with hypersensitivity pneumonitis (1). A biopsy was performed which showed necrotizing granulomas without any organisms. Although she got rid of her cockatiels, further history reveals that the patient still feeds pigeons.  The consensus (although by no means unanimous) was this was likely hypersensitivity pneumonitis with an unusual presentation. It was thought that a trial of steroids might be beneficial.
  2. Dr. Lewis Wesselius presented a 75-year-old woman with a thymic carcinoid tumor diagnosed in 2015. She was treated with resection and radiation therapy. CT scan showed changes consistent with radiation pneumonitis. Bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy showed “organizing pneumonitis”. She was treated with corticosteroids for 1 month. CT scan showed some improvement and the steroids were tapered. Her symptoms recurred and she was again started on corticosteroids with improvement but after tapering her steroids, her symptoms again recurred. CT scan showed marked worsening of the lung infiltrates. A bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsy was performed. The BAL showed 12% eosinophils and the biopsy was consistent with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia.
  3. Dr. Wesselius also presented a 79-year-old woman who had a right upper lobe resection for non-small cell lung cancer. A follow-up CT scan sometime later showed ground glass opacities (GGOs). A decision was made to follow the GGO’s but a year later CT scan showed worsening of the lesions. Navigational bronchoscopy was nondiagnostic. After a tumor board conference, she received radiation therapy for presumed carcinoma. She was followed but again had increasing shortness of breath. CT scan showed changes consistent with radiation pneumonitis. A long discussion ensued about empiric radiation therapy.
  4. Dr. George Parides presented a woman with a clinical history consistent with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and a CT scan which showed ground glass opacities. Most felt that this was IPF. Pirfenidone was started. A discussion about therapies, including experimental therapies for IPF ensued.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned about 8:30 PM. The next meeting will be in Phoenix on March 28 at 6:30 PM at HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital.

Richard A. Robbins MD

Editor, SWJPCC

Reference

  1. Franquet T, Hansell DM, Senbanjo T, Remy-Jardin M, Müller NL. Lung cysts in subacute hypersensitivity pneumonitis. J Comput Assist Tomogr. 2003 Jul-Aug;27(4):475-8.[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cite as: Robbins RA. January 2018 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2018;16(1):51-2. doi: https://doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc018-18 PDF 

Thursday
Nov202014

November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Jud Tillinghast was nominated as the Arizona Thoracic Society physician of the year.

Three cases were presented:

  1. George Parides presented a case of a 70-year-old woman with a 3 areas of ground glass picked up incidentally on CT scan. She had some wheezing. A needle biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma.  The biopsy and radiologic pattern were consistent with adenocarcinoma in situ or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Discussion centered around treatment. Most felt that if the areas could be removed that surgical resection was indicated (1).
  2. Lewis Wesselius presented a 60-year-old man with Marfan's syndrome and a history of an aortic valve replacement on chronic anticoagulation with a thyroid papillary carcinoma. The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy. Post-operatively he developed a large mass-like area in the right lower lung. It was unclear whether this was in the lung parenchymal or in the pleural space. A preliminary differential diagnosis of abscess, parenchymal hemorrhage or pleural hemorrhage was made. His INR was in the appropriate therapeutic range. A chest tube was placed with minimal drainage and no change in the radiographic appearance. Video-assisted thorascopic surgery (VATS) was performed and a large intraparenchymal hematoma was found which was removed. A review of the literature revealed a small number of reports of spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhages but none associated with Marfan's (2,3).
  3. Jasminder Mand presented a case of an asymptomatic 66-year-old man with inspiratory crackles and a mildly reduced diffusing capacity on pulmonary function testing. He had a past minimal smoking history. His CT scan showed areas of ground glass and reticulation surrounding of septal emphysema. An open lung biopsy was performed which was consistent with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). The patient raised the question of whether he should be treated with nintedanib or pirfenidone. There was disagreement amongst the audience with some favoring treatment while others favored following the patient.

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned about 8:00 PM. There is no meeting in December. The next meeting will be Phoenix on Wednesday, January, 6:30 PM at Scottsdale Shea Hospital.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

References

  1. Tsushima Y, Suzuki K, Watanabe S, Kusumoto M, Tsuta K, Matsuno Y, Asamura H. Multiple lung adenocarcinomas showing ground-glass opacities on thoracic computed tomography. Ann Thorac Surg. 2006;82(4):1508-10. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Riachy M, Mal H, Taillé C, Dauriat G, Groussard O, Cazals-Hatem D, Biondi G, Fournier M. Non-traumatic pulmonary haematoma complicating oral anticoagulation therapy. Respirology. 2007;12(4):614-6. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. Chakraborty AK, Dreisin RB. Pulmonary hematoma secondary to anticoagulant therapy. Ann Intern Med. 1982;96(1):67-9. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Reference as: Robbins RA. November 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2014;9(5):289-90. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc153-14 PDF

Sunday
Jun012014

May 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The May 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 5/28/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities.

A discussion was held regarding the Arizona Thoracic Society relationship with the American Lung Association. Several members volunteered to talk to the lung association regarding common ground to strengthen the relationship.

The wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting was a big success. There were about 55 at the meeting. The tasting will probably be held again next year.

At the ATS meeting data was presented that pirfenidone was effective in reducing the progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The data was published in the New England Journal of Medicine on 8/29/14 (1). Lewis Wesselius is one of the investigators enrolling patients in a phase 3 trial while InterMune reapplies to the FDA for approval of pirfenidone in IPF.

Two cases were presented:

  1. Lewis Wesselius from the Mayo Clinic Arizona presented a 53 year old woman with a chronic, nonproductive accompanied by malaise and a modest weight loss. She was treated for asthma without improvement.  She was a nonsmoker and had a SpO2 of 98% on room air. Her lungs were clear to auscultation.  Routine laboratory evaluation was unremarkable and exhaled nitric oxide was normal. Thoracic CT scan showed a subtle broncholitis. She was empirically treated for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) without improvement. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and showed Nocardia asteroides. She had no evidence of immunocompromise. She was treated with sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim which produced a rash and then minocycline for 4 months. Her cough resolved. However, when the minocycline was stopped her cough returned. She is currently receiving an additional course of minocycline planned for 6 months.
  2. Suresh Uppalapu presented a 58 year old fireman with a complaint of dyspnea on exertion. He has a history of obstructive sleep apnea and lives at an elevation of 7000 feet. The patient had significant desaturation with exercise. Chest x-ray showed borderline cardiomegaly but was otherwise normal. Thoracic CT scan showed pulmonary artery enlargement and borderline right ventricular (RV) enlargement. Ultrasound of the hear showed an enlarged RV but it was difficult to measure PA pressure.  Right-sided heart catherization showed a mean pulmonary artery pressure of 35 cm H2O with a  step up in the oxygen saturation at the right atrium. Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) showed a patent foramen ovale (PFO).  Insertion of a balloon stopped the right to left shunting but resulted in a significant increase in the pulmonary artery pressure. He was referred for percutaneous closure of the PFO along with treatment of his pulmonary artery hypertension.

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned about 8:15 PM. The June meeting is scheduled for Tucson. There will be no meeting in July. The next meeting in Phoenix will be a case presentation conference on August 27, 6:30 PM at Scottsdale Shea Hospital.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

Reference

  1. King TE Jr, Bradford WZ, Castro-Bernardini S, et al. A phase 3 trial of pirfenidone in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. N Engl J Med 2014;370:2083-92. [CrossRef] [PubMed] 

Reference as: Robbins RA. May 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2014;8(6): 297-8. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc072-14 PDF