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Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

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November 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes 
July 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2018 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
July 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
July 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
February 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
December 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
October 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
July 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
June 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2013 Council of Chapter Representatives Notes
May 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
April 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes 
March 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
March 2013 Council of Chapter Representatives Meeting 
and “Hill Day” Notes
February 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
January 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
November 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
October 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
September 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
August 2012 Special Meeting Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
June 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes
May 2012 Council of Chapter Representatives Meeting
May 2012 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

 

For a complete list of the Arizona Thoracic Society notes click here.

The Arizona Thoracic Society meets every other month in Phoenix, usually on the fourth Wednesday of odd numbered months, from 6:30-8:00  PM at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Hospital located at Shea and 90th Street in Phoenix. During these meetings dinner and case presentations occur.

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Thursday
May282015

May 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The May 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, May 27, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities.

Ms. Georgann VanderJagt, RN, MSN gave an update on clinical trials at Dignity Health including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. To contact Ms. VanderJagt call her office at 602-406-3825, her cell at 602-615-2377 or by email at georgann.vaderjagt@digniftyhealth.org.  

Dr. Michael Smith, the surgical director for the lung transplant program at Dignity Health, gave an overview of their lung transplant program. They are currently the fifth busiest transplant program in the US.  They have done 46 lung transplants so far this year. They are on a par with UCLA in number of transplants and survival has been at the National average. Average wait time is only abut 2 weeks. He also discussed recent and ongoing transplant protocols. To contact Dr. Smith call 602-406-7564.

There were 4 case presentations:

  1. Jud Tillinghast presented a case of a large man who was short of breath. His CT scan showed multiple calcifications in the lower lobes. It was felt that clinically he was most likely aspirating as a cause of the calcifications.
  2. Gerald Swartzberg presented a case of a large man who had some minimal dyspnea and an elevated right hemidiaphragm. His chest x-ray showed consolidation in this right lower lung. He had been seen at the Mayo Clinic and Dr. Lewis Wesselius reviewed his pathology from a needle biopsy of a right lower lobe nodule which was nonspecific. Reviewing his case he also had a biopsy from Sloan Kettering in 2006 which was also nonspecific. Further history was obtained and the patient admitted he was using Vick's Vaporub in his nose since he was 7 years old. It was unclear if this was the cause of his right lower lobe consolidation.
  3. Dr. Swartzberg presented a second case of a 70-year-old woman with multiple medical problems. She has a cockatiel but is remarkably asymptomatic. A chest x-ray was taken showed nonspecific lower lobe changes. Pulmonary function tests showed a reduced vital capacity but a normal to high total lung capacity. A DLCO was not able to be obtained. CT scan showed small nodules with ground glass in her lower lobes. It was felt that most likely this was a hypersensitivity pneumonitis secondary to her bird. She got rid of the bird but did not improve.  The cause of her abnormal pulmonary radiology remains unclear.
  4. Dr. Wesselius presented a case of a patient with a chronic cough which had been treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids. When he as on oral corticosteroids he was perhaps somewhat better. He was seen at the University of Massachusetts without a diagnosis being made. He subsequently moved to the Phoenix area and was evaluated at the Mayo Clinic. Chest x-ray showed consolidation in his right upper lobe. On bronchoscopy he had some whitish plaques along his trachea and main bronchi. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed 89% eosinophils and his transbronchial biopsy was consistent with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Apparently, this association has previously been sporadically reported. He was started on prednisone and improved.

Dr. Jud Tillinghast was acknowledged as the Arizona Thoracic Society Clinician of the Year and one of the four finalists as ATS Clinician of the Year.

After a brief discussion, the membership agreed to encourage and help Nevada form a state thoracic society.

There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned about 8 PM. The next meeting will be in Phoenix at Scottsdale Shea on Wednesday, July 22 at 6:30 PM.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

Editor, SWJPCC

Reference as: Robbins RA. May 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2015;10(5):304-5. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc075-15 PDF

Sunday
Mar292015

March 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The March 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 25, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, radiology and oncology communities.

Dr. Richard Robbins made a presentation entitled "The History of Exhaled Nitric Oxide Measurement" focusing on the development of exhaled nitric oxide in the early 1990's.

There were 3 case presentations:

  1. Sandra Till, a third year pulmonary fellow at the Good Samaritan/VA program, presented an elderly man admitted to the Phoenix VA with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). His CT findings showed with centrilobular emphysema, bronchial edema, and scattered ground glass opacities. It was felt that the CT findings most likely represented a bronchiolitis from his exacerbation of COPD.
  2. Richard Robbins presented a 49 year old man with a positive PPD and Gold QuantiFERON who has extensive psoriasis and had biological therapy with etanercept recommended. He had an extensive past medical history of diabetes and sleep apnea secondary to obesity which resolved with gastric bypass. His liver was palpable at his right costal margin and his liver enzymes were mildly elevated. Chest x-ray was normal. Most felt that therapy for latent tuberculosis was indicated with some recommending isoniazid, others recommending rifampin and others recommending both drugs. He was treated for one month with isoniazid and his liver enzymes all declined into the normal range. He has begun etanercept and 6-9 months of isoniazid therapy are planned.
  3. Stephanie Fountain, a second year internal medicine resident from the Good Samaritan/VA program presented an elderly man with a history of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas treated with chemotherapy and radiation in Chicago just prior to moving to Phoenix. He presented with abdominal pain secondary to an ileus which spontaneously improved. A CT scan performed during the abdominal evaluation showed multiple small nodules and some scattered ground glass opacities which was reminiscent of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia with cystic changes. Biopsy showed adenocarcinoma which special stains were most consistent with a pancreas primary. Discussion ensued about this unusual presentation CT presentation of metastatic pancreatic cancer.

The next meeting in Phoenix will be at Scottsdale Shea on Wednesday, May 27 at 6:30 PM.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

Editor, SWJPCC

Reference as: Robbins RA. March 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2015;10(3):149. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc041-15 PDF

Saturday
Jan312015

January 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

Dr. Judd Tillinghast was presented a plaque in recognition of being chosen by his colleagues as the Arizona Thoracic Society Physician of the Year In 2014.  

Dr. Rajeev Saggar made a presentation entitled "Pulmonary fibrosis-associated pulmonary hypertension: a unique phenotype".  This presentation focused on new echocardiographic methods of assessing right ventricular (RV) function and the pathophysiology of RV dysfunction. Dr. Saggar presented data from a paper he authored on parenteral treprostinil in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary artery hypertension which was published in Thorax (1).

There were 2 case presentations, both from the Phoenix VA by Dr. Elijah Poulos:

  1. A 65 year-old man presented with cough and chills.  His past medical history included multiple myeloma treated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy to spine and bone marrow transplant.  He had a prior vertebroplasty. His symptoms did not improve with doxycycline.  Computerized tomography angiography was done and showed areas of unusual abnormalities in lung that were very high density.  This was determined to be cement emboli from the prior vertebroplasty (pulmonary cement emboli, PCE) which has been previously reported as a complication of this procedure.  The appropriate treatment options in this case were discussed.
  2. A 69 year-old man presented with dyspnea on exertion over past couple of years.  Chest radiography showed abnormal areas of central fibrosis with sparing of the lung periphery.  A thoracic CT scan also demonstrated central fibrotic/cystic changes.  The patient subsequently admitted to use of crack cocaine which started at age 59.  There are reports of similar pulmonary fibrosis associated with use of crack cocaine (2).  The possible pathophysiologic mechanisms were discussed.

The next meeting in Phoenix will be at Scottsdale Shea on Wednesday, March 25 at 6:30 PM.

Lewis J. Wesselius, MD

President, Arizona Thoracic Society

References

  1. Saggar R, Khanna D, Vaidya A, et al. Changes in right heart haemodynamics and echocardiographic function in an advanced phenotype of pulmonary hypertension and right heart dysfunction associated with pulmonary fibrosis. Thorax. 2014;69(2):123-9. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. O'Donnell AE, Mappin FG, Sebo TJ, Tazelaar H. Interstitial pneumonitis associated with "crack" cocaine abuse. Chest. 1991;100(4):1155-7. [CrossRef] [PubMed] 

Reference as: Wesselius LJ. January 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2015;10(1):56. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc012-15 PDF 

Thursday
Nov202014

November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Jud Tillinghast was nominated as the Arizona Thoracic Society physician of the year.

Three cases were presented:

  1. George Parides presented a case of a 70-year-old woman with a 3 areas of ground glass picked up incidentally on CT scan. She had some wheezing. A needle biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma.  The biopsy and radiologic pattern were consistent with adenocarcinoma in situ or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Discussion centered around treatment. Most felt that if the areas could be removed that surgical resection was indicated (1).
  2. Lewis Wesselius presented a 60-year-old man with Marfan's syndrome and a history of an aortic valve replacement on chronic anticoagulation with a thyroid papillary carcinoma. The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy. Post-operatively he developed a large mass-like area in the right lower lung. It was unclear whether this was in the lung parenchymal or in the pleural space. A preliminary differential diagnosis of abscess, parenchymal hemorrhage or pleural hemorrhage was made. His INR was in the appropriate therapeutic range. A chest tube was placed with minimal drainage and no change in the radiographic appearance. Video-assisted thorascopic surgery (VATS) was performed and a large intraparenchymal hematoma was found which was removed. A review of the literature revealed a small number of reports of spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhages but none associated with Marfan's (2,3).
  3. Jasminder Mand presented a case of an asymptomatic 66-year-old man with inspiratory crackles and a mildly reduced diffusing capacity on pulmonary function testing. He had a past minimal smoking history. His CT scan showed areas of ground glass and reticulation surrounding of septal emphysema. An open lung biopsy was performed which was consistent with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). The patient raised the question of whether he should be treated with nintedanib or pirfenidone. There was disagreement amongst the audience with some favoring treatment while others favored following the patient.

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned about 8:00 PM. There is no meeting in December. The next meeting will be Phoenix on Wednesday, January, 6:30 PM at Scottsdale Shea Hospital.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

References

  1. Tsushima Y, Suzuki K, Watanabe S, Kusumoto M, Tsuta K, Matsuno Y, Asamura H. Multiple lung adenocarcinomas showing ground-glass opacities on thoracic computed tomography. Ann Thorac Surg. 2006;82(4):1508-10. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Riachy M, Mal H, Taillé C, Dauriat G, Groussard O, Cazals-Hatem D, Biondi G, Fournier M. Non-traumatic pulmonary haematoma complicating oral anticoagulation therapy. Respirology. 2007;12(4):614-6. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. Chakraborty AK, Dreisin RB. Pulmonary hematoma secondary to anticoagulant therapy. Ann Intern Med. 1982;96(1):67-9. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Reference as: Robbins RA. November 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2014;9(5):289-90. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc153-14 PDF

Thursday
Sep252014

September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society Notes

The September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 9/24/14 at the Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus in Tucson beginning at 5:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 21 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities.

Four cases were presented:

  1. Mohammad Dalabih presented a 22 year old hypoxic man with a history of asthma and abdominal pain. A bubble echocardiogram showed bubbles in the left ventricle within 3 heartbeats. Thoracic CT scan showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVMs). The patient underwent coil embolization and improved. Dr. Dalabih reviewed the diagnosis and management of pulmonary AVMs (1). Aarthi Ganesh presented a 70 year old woman complaining of dyspnea on exertion. A chest x-ray showed complete opacification of the right hemithorax and a thoracic CT scan showed a large right pleural effusion with right lung atelectasis. After thoracentesis was nondiagnostic, she underwent video-assisted thorascopic surgery (VATS). Although she clinically appeared to have mesothelioma, histology was consistent with a pseudomesotheliomatous adenocarcinoma. She is currently undergoing treatment with platinum based agents.
  2. Gordon Carr presented a 75 year old woman with dyspnea. Chest x-ray showed interstitial disease with a possible usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern on CT scan. Dr. Carr reviewed the initial evaluation and diagnosis of the interstitial lung disease (2). VATS showed a bronchocentric process with some fibrosis in the periphery most consistent with chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis. The likely source was thought to be mold in her indoor pool area.
  3. James Knepler presented a 55 year old woman with breast cancer and bone metases receiving tamoxifen. She also had a history of multiple sclerosis and was receiving on interferon-beta 1a. A positron emission tomography (PET) scan showed increased uptake in several mediastinal lymph nodes. Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) guided aspiration biopsy was non-diagnostic. Endobronchial biopsy showed granulomas. It was felt the most likely diagnosis was interferon-induced sarcoidosis. Several case reports have recently been published.

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned about 7:00 PM. The next meeting will be Phoenix on Wednesday, October 22, 6:30 PM at Scottsdale Shea Hospital.

Richard A. Robbins, MD

References

  1. Gossage JR, Kanj G. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. A state of the art review. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998;158(2):643-61. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Selman M, Pardo A. Update in diffuse parenchymal lung disease 2012. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013;187(9):920-5. [CrossRef] [PubMed] 

Reference as: Robbins RA. September 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society notes. Southwest J Pulm Crit Care. 2014;9(3):191-2. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.13175/swjpcc127-14 PDF